J-1 Intern/Trainee

Or other work based ICCE J-1 internship/training programs in the U.S.

The J-1 Intern/Trainee programs and other similar work based internship/training programs are year-round programs. Participants arrive in the U.S. on the programs throughout the year.

J-1 participants are exempt from Social Security and Medicare tax.
All J-1 participants are temporary visitors with non-resident, non-immigrant status and are not eligible to receive the benefits of U.S. social programs such as Social Security, Medicare and FUTA and are therefore exempt from paying these taxes.

As a host company, you are exempt from Social Security, Medicare (FICA), and Federal Unemployment taxes for the J-1 participants.

Yes. Participants who earn income while in the United States ARE subject to Federal (always), State and City taxes (as applicable). Failure to report and pay Federal Income taxes may result in the loss of future visitation privileges to the U.S.

Yes. ICCE assesses applicants’ spoken English skills through an online based English assessment test and/or webcam interview. All applicants are also interviewed in English at the U.S. Embassy before they are granted a J-1 Visa in their home country.

Yes, this is possible. ICCE would evaluate the eligibility for you and your candidate, and if eligible, we would proceed as a self-arranged placement.

No, your company does not sponsor the participant’s visa. As a J-1 visa sponsor organization designated by the U.S. Department of State, ICCE or one of ICCE’s partners will be the participant’s visa sponsor.

No, host organizations do not pay for being a part of this program or for ICCE’s services.

Participants cannot be placed in unskilled or casual labor positions, in positions that involve child care or elderly care, cosmetology, martial arts, or any kind of work that involves patient care or direct physical contact.

The Intern Program’s maximum duration is 12 months, and the maximum duration for the Trainee Program is 18 months.

The J-1 Rules & Regulations state a minimum of 32 hours per week as a requirement. Most companies opt to utilize a regular 40 hour, full-time schedule for participants.

No. The J-1 Intern/Trainee participants are not allowed to have a second job.

Following the completion of the J-1 Program, the period defined on the Form DS-2019, the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) allows participants a 30-day travel period commonly referred to as the “Grace Period.” During this 30-day grace period, participants are no longer in J-visa status, and are under the jurisdiction of the INS. The INS grants this period to allow participants to settle their affairs and to prepare to return to their home countries. Program participants may no longer continue and/or complete exchange activities, nor may they work. Although participants may travel in the United States, it is recommended that they do not travel beyond the borders of the United States as they may not be permitted reentry.

This is a legal document that is issued by a J-1 Visa sponsor designated by the U.S. Department of State. This document entitles and authorizes a foreign national to participate in a training provided by the U.S. based company and to receive compensation for such activity.

J-1 Summer Work Travel

Work Travel participants arrive ready to work during March, April, May, June, November, and December, depending on the country that they are coming from.

J-1 participants are exempt from Social Security and Medicare tax.
All J-1 participants are temporary visitors with nonresident, nonimmigrant status and are not eligible to receive the benefits of U.S. social programs such as Social Security, Medicare and FICA and are therefore exempt from paying these taxes.

As a host employer, you are exempt from Social Security, Medicare, and Federal Unemployment taxes for the J-1 participants.

Yes. Participants who earn income while in the United States ARE subject to Federal (always), State and City taxes (as applicable). Failure to report and pay Federal Income taxes may result in the loss of future visitation privileges to the U.S.

No, your company does not sponsor a participant’s visa. As a J-1 visa sponsor organization designated by the U.S. Department of State, ICCE or one of ICCE’s partners will be the participant’s visa sponsor.

No, your company does not pay for being a part of this program or for ICCE’s services.

Yes. On this program, all jobs must be of a seasonal nature. The jobs also should not involve any type of patient care or physical handling or manipulation of clients, factory labor, or driving. If the jobs completely isolate the participants from American co-workers or customers or don’t provide a sufficient cultural component, the programs will not be approved.

Yes. However, the participants must get approval from ICCE first. If there is a possibility that their second job affects the performance and attitude of their primary job, ICCE may not approve the second job.

Following the completion of the J-1 Program, the period defined on the Form DS-2019, the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) allows participants a 30-day travel period commonly referred to as the “Grace Period.” During this 30-day grace period, participants are no longer in J-visa status, and are under the jurisdiction of the INS. The INS grants this period to allow participants to settle their affairs and to prepare to return to their home countries. Program participants may no longer continue and/or complete exchange activities, nor may they work. Although participants may travel in the United States, it is recommended that they do not travel beyond the borders of the United States as they may not be permitted reentry.

This is a legal document which is issued by a J-1 Visa sponsor designated by the U.S. Department of State. This document entitles and authorizes a foreign national to participate in a training provided by the U.S. based company and to receive compensation for such activity.